2016 Best of the Net Nominations

Congratulations to our nominations for
Best of the Net!

The Hired Man” by KateLynn Hibbard

Brown Tissue Moth” by Carrie Albert

The Dinner” by Ron Burch

Scheherazade” by James Gallant

 

The following are nominations from our Trigger Warning issue. Please download the PDF to read:

“Snowstorms and Trigger Warnings” by Krista Cox – p. 6

“In the Woods” by Lisa Chavez – p. 36

“Elegy for a Child Bride” by Lakshmi Mitra – p. 76

“Morning Song” by Marina Carreira – p. 119

“A Reclaiming” by Siaara Freeman – p. 166

“Our Family Quartet” by Jane Miller – p. 191

 

For information on the Best of the Net anthology, visit Sundress Publications.
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Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

I adore chapbooks. Usually themed, they can simmer a story down to its bare emotional essentials, while at the same time displaying a keen sense of language. Like a full length collection, their forms of self-expression run the gamut from poetry to fiction to nonfiction and even hybrid works—all in a delightfully consumable-in-one-sitting package. In our Give It To Me E-gain issue you will find a sampling of this diversity, and like a chapbook, this spotlight of works selected by our staff is designed to be a brief read. Their impact though is anything but ephemeral.

Raquel Thorne

Give It to Me E-gain Final Cover

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The BureauThe Bureau
Les Kay

Poetry
30 pages
Sundress Publications (2015)
FREE pdf

On the conference call, Rimbaud complained
from Vladivostok that several ventures would suffer
languid sales and laughable costs if the training staff cannot
convey the softer side of capitalism

(from “An Apple That Falls”)

A narrative which is both disjunctive and invasive, The Bureau imagines a systemic corralling of the everyman in a world with a capitalist governmental run organization loves its populace into assuming compliant positions. While not quite detailing a dystopian, at least not from the viewpoint of our narrator, who may or may not be losing his mind, the manuscript is eerie and makes poignant connections to our own society. The Bureau is also playful, incorporating elements of magical realism and occasional humor with characters such as an iguana who consults, a boss who may or may not be Satan, and a Spanish-speaking collie, who is, after all, a bitch. Published in a typewriter font and incorporating redaction, the presentation is as smart as the writing.

Read excerpts from The Bureau

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Call It a PremonitionCall It a Premonition
Jess Feldman

Poetry
18 pages
BOAAT Press (2015)
FREE pdf

What is the Voynich Manuscript? A complex code, some lost language, or a hoax? (Or, as this reviewer previously believed, an excuse for a medieval doodler to draw fantastical plants, astronomical musings, and naked ladies bathing?) Voynich Manuscrit Naked Bathing

By offering us a translation, Call It a Premonition does what scientists, linguists, and even a team of WWII code breakers have not been able to do. Feldman’s author of the Voynich Manuscript is a young woman growing up in the 1400s and an avid diary keeper. Starting with an account of how “sir gawain won’t look at me/ even though I wore my best frock,” this wildly charming echap, full of smart side-eye, walks the line between the gender expectations of middle ages and a modern feminist lens.

Read excerpts from Call It a Premonition

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Forensic ForagingForensic Foraging with Crawdaddy
Cover Artist William C. Crawford

These photos embody the forensic foraging technique of photography Crawford developed with his colleague, Sydney lensman, Jim Provencher. Whether in color or black and white, they feature extensive shooting of everything encountered, bringing Main Street Americana and abroad alive in their most base, everyday state. The images are then selectively presented with heavy contrast and saturation, with minimal computer manipulation. This genre borrows heavily from Stephen Shore and his color post cards from Amarillo, as well as the photographic DNA of Walker Evans on the move (foraging?). Read more about this technique in the essay “Forensic Foraging Embraces Minimalist Throwback Techniques To Unlock An Evolving Photographic Genre,” co-authored by Provencher.

View Art Feature

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In the Voice of a Minor SaintIn the Voice of a Minor Saint
Sarah J. Sloat

Poetry
38 pages
Sundress Publications (reprint 2016; originally published Tilt Press 2009)
FREE pdf

If the moon comes out bearing nicks and bite marks,
you’ll find me smoothing my skin of its cares tonight.

Under a halo the size of a ring, the old
arguments sit splitting their oldest hairs tonight.

Look at me crooked. Mistake me for Eve. If looks
deceive, who knows which mask our maker wears tonight?

(from “Ghazal with Heavenly Bodies”)

In the Voice of a Minor Saint highlights the extraordinary in ordinary moments: the golden of a shaft of wheat, the heavy buzzing of bees at the end of summer, the sadness of a barren womb. Her language is rich and musical, never overbearing and always tonal. Sloat gives voice to the forgotten, the disenchanting, the wallflower of the world; she unwraps her universe carefully and lovingly. Each poem is always delicately woven, each word carefully picked; it is difficult not to be moved and charmed by the recurring themes and feelings conveyed in this book, not to elevate to sainthood what may seem insignificant. I was delighted to discover not one but two Ghazals in the folds of this chapbook, a form we do not often seeone more minor saint brought to our attention by Sloat’s clever writing.

Read excerpts from In the Voice of a Minor Saint

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The Marriage BedThe Marriage Bed
Elaine Ford
Fiction
62 pages
Wordrunner eChapbooks (November 14, 2015)
FREE to read online, $2.99 Kindle & additional formats on Smashwords

The seven stories in The Marriage Bed examine the ways that romantic relationships are complex, risky, and disappointing endeavors that people can’t help but enter into. In the collection’s third story, ironically titled “Rita Lafferty’s Lucky Summer,” an unnamed narrator tells the story of her thirty-year-old female coworker’s love affair with a man who proves not to be what she initially thought. Ford develops the boyfriend’s deceit skillfully. He is purportedly a train conductor, yet is always available to pick Rita up after her work shift, no matter what time she gets off. When the narrator questions this, Rita naively answers, “He has a lot of seniority. He gets first crack at the work sheet.” In response, the narrator tells us, “Well, I believed it if she did.” Ford crafts her characters with compassion. Even when the two young women discover the boyfriend passed out in his apartment after failing to pick Rita up after work, and his drinking problem is exposed, no judgment is made of him. Or of Rita, for becoming his fiancée.

Read an excerpt from The Marriage Bed

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Medicine by Tomas BirdMedicine
Tomas Bird & The Madman’s Cabaret
EP (2016)
3 Songs
£1.50 GBP  BandCamp any and all proceeds donated to charity

Redemption for me I think,
Is now slim.

(from “Meteoros”)

Previously published in our Trigger Warning issue with his song “Senses,” Bird is back with a new EP Medicine. With a haunting ambient quality, Bird seamlessly mixes folk and psychedelic qualities together with his own soulful lyrics. Although only three songs long, this EP is a burning mix of contradictions, providing a stunning breadth of the human experience.

Take heed of the warnings,
But follow your heart.
                ***
The only aim you see,
Is to live.

(from “Draw in the Dirt”)

Listen to a sample from Medicine

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NeilNeil
J. Bradley
Flash Fiction
26 pages
Five Quarterly (2015)
FREE Issuu

Neil asks where the photos are. I hand him a sheet of paper, his favorite green crayon. “What do you want to remember?”

“Mom.”

“You know what to do.”

The crayon hits my collarbone. “I know you have to have at least one photo of her. Where is it?”

It’s better you forget. It’s better to learn to quit missing her.

(from “Habitat”)

Simultaneously sweet and creepy, Neil creates parallels between father and son. First our narrator about he and his son (the titular Neil), and then he and his father. Parenting techniques that go from “straight out of Parenthood magazine” to “curious but effective and clever” to “worse than The Great Santini” to “something isn’t right” actually serve a narrative purpose. Intergenerational kidnapping. In both: A motherless upbringing. A call to be absolutely average to avoid attention. A call to simultaneously remember and forget. For the narrator, this is second nature and, for whatever the reason, he continues his father’s tradition. No explanation offered. No explanation ever given. Not by his father to him nor one from him to Neil. Cleverly written, this is a piece full of questions with no answers. Infer and guess at your own risk.

Read excerpts from Neil

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No Ghost Goes UnnoticedNo Ghost Goes Unnoticed
M. Drew Williams
Poetry
21 pages
Leaf Garden Press (2016)
FREE pdf or name your price epub/mobi

No Ghost Goes Unnoticed is sure of itself, and aware of its distance from the world at large and its curator’s core, though as the poems progress, it becomes clear: it was not always this way. Its enticing medical metaphors slowly color in the story with hints of the poet’s empathetic, and often self-deprecating, character through poems about seemingly insignificant things as is highlighted in “Comparison.” While the cold, removed voice generically gives little away about the underlying story, there are refreshing moments of sensitivity as with “An Elegy for Daytime.” The author offers many metaphors for his distant voice in, “The Desert is Decidedly Quiet,” “Image of a Stranger,” “Conquistador,” among others. The work showcased in No Ghost Goes Unnoticed gives away how visceral the experiences that led to this book were, to house the startling awareness they give the reader. “Palabras” gives the most insight into his interactions with people, eloquently, using wordplay about a designated number of words recycled to get through the author’s day. No Ghost Goes Unnoticed explains depression, loss, and numbness in both exceedingly vulnerable and impassive, if unfeeling, ways.

Read excerpts from No Ghost Goes Unnoticed

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The Persistence of BonylegThe Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated
Sarah Minor
Hybrid
48 pages
Essay Press (2015)
FREE Issuu or pdf

126. Narrator: Maybe I will have a little child for a while. Then, when she gets too big, when she first starts hurting, I will eat her.

127. Narrator: She will only ever be the right kind of alone.

This hybrid essay explores the manner in which our patriarchal society has historically, and currently, talked about women, particularly those existing outside of the normative expectations of heterosexual marriage. With many irons in the fire, The Persistence of the Bonyleg juxtaposes the real-life history of the Lykov family, a Russian family of Old Believers who moved deep into the wilderness to avoid prosecution, with the mythology of Baba Yaga, elements of traditional fairy tale narrative, the writings of Croatian writer Dubravka Ugrešić, and the narrator’s own interjections. Agafia Lykov, the last surviving family member and an unmarried older woman, is placed center-stage. Stylistically, The Persistence of the Bonyleg splits its narrative between two collocating writing styles. Even pages recount the Lykov’s family’s struggles and religious practices in the taiga, chronicled in poetic passages which are narrated by a tree stump (one recalls The Giving Tree). Odd pages take inspiration from the Bible by numbering their verses and script conventions (most likely an influence from the documentary Far Out: Agafia’s Taiga Life) where each line is voiced by a character. Rather than lead the reader directly to a single thesis, Minor’s feminist essay asks the reader to confront the text and allow their thoughts to take part in the conversation.

Read excerpts from The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated

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PortagePortage
Sarah Ann Winn

Poetry
21 pages
Sundress Publications (2015)
FREE pdf

I was made to portage, by Portage, a girl raised by reservoirs,

lifted from one lake and carried to the next,
made to find joy in journeys.

(from “Alma”)

Stringing together vivid tellings from youth and discovery to loss and regaining wonder, Winn reminds us of the fluidity of our lives, however jagged moments seem in the now. There is movement, always some sort of progression. The highlight of this collection is simplicity: the poetry is both relatable but individual with focal points such as apples, a hammer, or camera lens. These seemingly trivial objects add tremendous depth to the poemsas we notice there’s always an object in our recollection that seems insignificant to a broader picture but was, in truth, the center of a moment.

Read excerpts from Portage

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Revisiting Dreamworlds
Revisiting Dreamworlds: Art Feature
Eddy Martin Graham

Graham’s artwork is about individuals becoming their own selves within their dreamworlds, the facing of hard facts within reality, and how by intertwining fantasy with the day to day, humans manifest their own destinies.

View Art Feature

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Shake It Up & Throw It at Something Hard
Shake it up & throw it at something hard
BT Shaw
Hybrid
30 pages
Essay Press (2016)
FREE Issuu or pdf

So you think creating a baby makes someone intelligent. I would say the opposite may be true. Why would a peaceful person like Jesus create a baby?

(from, “If Jesus was perfect, how come he couldn’t solve calculus problems and equations and create the atomic baby?”)

A game of mad libs gone awry (“Babies for bombs! Bombs for babies!”), Shake it up and throw it at something hard does more than cause some silly imagery. In the process of finding humor in a thousand babies pelting down on an unsuspecting city or swaddled-up bombs given names like Kimmy or Bryan as they are presented fresh and pink and blinking to the world, the reader is forced to give pause. In the midst of this laughter, there is a deeper contextual possibility. Overpopulation. Humans waging war. Bombs created. Bombs as tools…but only for war. (What else could bombs be? Even fireworks contain danger.) Lack of sexual education. Romanticizing war; downplaying destruction. Accessibility, accessibility, accessibility. In short: A strange yet marvelous read.

Read excerpts from Shake it up & throw it at something hard

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When Minerva's Knees Hit the Ground
When Minerva’s Knees Hit the Ground
Amanda Oaks
Poetry
55 pages
Words Dance Publishing (2016)
FREE pdf

but my mind
was made
for the game
it plays,

it lives
for the bluff

(from “In This Room We Can’t Touch the Floor”)

Oaks nods to The Deftones with this collection, but whether you dig the band or not isn’t a huge deal; these poems have their own appeal, while maintaining the rhythmic and emotive draw of music. Where that likeness ends is the conversational approach she takes to point the pieces inward or toward a lover, all while keeping things curiously anonymous. The erasures come across blunt, but show intent, whereas the original poems they’re paired with bounce between the chaos of infatuation, admissions of flaws, and the way hurt contributes to self-awareness. This layout gives the book a unique posture: strong, with earned fragilities, but ultimately resilient.

Read excerpts from When Minerva’s Knees Hit the Ground

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Reviews & Interviews

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Support a fee-free reader award and get awesome perks, including handwritten poems by Trigger Warning poets Siaara Freeman and Heather Bell, or limited edition postcards by Trigger Warning’s guest editor Meggie Royer! Help Launch Tandem Reader Awards.

TRA AD 2016 Final

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PPP&P #2 Summer 2016

PPP&P3

PPP&P spotlights recently published work from our sister journals at Sundress Publications: Pretty Owl Poetry, Rogue Agent, Stirring, and Wicked Alice. Much like the astrology practiced in Telangana in which a parrot is used to pick some cards as luck for the customer, Prasanna hopes her picks will bring luck (and inspiration) to our readers.

 

Pretty Owl Poetry

Kami Westhoff‘s “No Thought of the Surface” has the lure and mystery of nature, enigma of La Belle Dame Sans Merci. I have found myself after talking to a friend, rushing to the cafeteria for coffee, and analysed why only to find that it was the bands of light brown and cream of her shirt that took me in coffee trance. It made me question who issues the commands here.

Think of an incident where you were surprised by what you did like you were in a trance. Make a poem of who or what was the influence.

*

Tyler McAndrew‘s “My Trip to the Zoo” is an internal dialogue in the face of limelight barrage. It took me to a moment in a science fair and make believe. A world where a cardboard can be fashioned to mean anything.

Think of a moment that resonates with this blurring of the real worlds and other, silence in commotion. Bring it out to the poetry world.

 

Rogue Agent

Steven Sanchez‘s “Califia” shows what it is for a human body machine to creak. There’s repair by Kintsugi and the repair within the body.

our bodies spend our entire lives
destroying their own cells,
its only method of healing.

We know our bodies only when they are off. Write of a time when you heard your body make itself known.

*

Heidi Czerwiec‘s “Doggerel” is a description of Puella pilosa a woodcutting in Monstrorum Historia by Ulisse Aldrovandi, in which the poet slides into the antique curio.

Write from a curio’s point of view.

Stirring

Emari DiGiorgio‘s in “Elegy for the Old Thinking” does a thought duet with theoretical physicist James Gate, making parallels between birth of a baby and theory. Even though an elegy, the dark is crossed over and that weight is carried on by life.

the branches and roots cancel out each other

Bring out your best metaphor for the cycle of life and death.

*

Kathryn Paul‘s “In the Year of No Mother” brings a raw energy to the jaggy edges of a mother-daughter relationship, its swivel doors recalling maternal loss and yet still finding her presence in everyday life.

so I dump the overwrought bouquet
into the largest vessel I can find:
the jar from my blender,

Write a poem in the memory of a lost loved onebecause it says to.

 

 

Feel free to share your responses to Prasanna’s prompts in the comments below!

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Help Support Fee-Free Awards!

Please visit the Tandem Reader Awards Fundraiser

TRA AD 2016 Final

Donating to their campaign has some really nice—and unique—perks! Including handwritten poems signed by the author from poets Kaveh Akbar, Heather Bell, Sarah Blake, Chen Chen, Siaara Freeman, and Megan Peak.

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Tandem Reader Awards is a FEE-FREE post-publication award for chapbooks, where the award will be given to both the author and editor of the winning chapbook. TRA began as an idea in 2015 when we noticed a deficit of reader awards for chapbooks and a similar deficit of reader awards for editors. As we discussed these needs in our community, we realized an additional and more prevalent need in our community for more accessible awards.

TRA believes it is important to acknowledge the hurdles, including submission fees, impeding accessibility to many awards in our creative community, especially for minority and marginalized voices. We asked ourselves: What if we could award the special relationship between writer and editor, while pledging our commitment to being broadly accessible within the literary community by maintaining fee-free nominations? The answer was clear: We can. These ideas work beautifully in tandem and you can help make it happen.

Our goal is to raise a minimum of $2,000 to cover the initial start-up costs: A PO box for mail nominations, a checking account, promotional materials, and registering for our 501c3. Additionally your contribution will go towards the $150 prize awarded each to the editor and the author of the winning chapbook, and will guarantee the first two years of the awards. Any additional funds raised over $2,000 will sweeten the prize pot; we hope to surpass the $150 prize amount for our winners and demonstrate community support and commitment to a more inclusive writer community, where we can honor the work first and foremost.

Donate Here

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Now on Tap: Submission Calls May 2016

Home Brews

Homebrew: Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

For our summer issue we want to read e-chapbooks published from January 2014 to May 2016. Self published is okay, but each chapbook must be available for download online through a publisher or personal website. Chapbooks that are not currently available online do not qualify. We are not interested in your unpublished manuscripts at this time.

SUBMIT ONE CHAPBOOK ONLY. All members of our staff will be reading cover letters this issue—think of it as your back cover. Get our attention with 50-150 words describing your chapbook, a biography, and a link to where your chapbook may be purchased or downloaded online.

Selected e-chapbooks will be showcased in July with a mini review by one of our staff members and a mini feature of selected work (2-3 poems; 1-10 pages of prose).

Submissions due 6/11/16.  Issue live 7/31/16.

 

 

Guest Taps

 

“Unseen” at Melancholy Hyperbole – MH is interested in poetry about longing. This can mean anything from unrequited lust to the loss of a pet. Whatever the subject matter, it must not be boring or corny. Send us your best interpretation of the theme “Unseen”. Submissions due 5/31/16. Read more & submit at melancholyhyperbole.com. **Melancholy Hyperbole is now also open for book review queries.

“Scholarship Applications for BinderCon NYC 2016” via Out of the Binders Scholarship Program. Designed to increase diversity, BinderCon is offering free admission to up to 25 promising writers who might not otherwise be able to attend due to financial hardship. Diversity includes but is not limited to: age; racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds; sexual orientation; gender identity; marital and parental status; disability. The scholarships include free attendance to all the events on Saturday, October 29, and Sunday, October 30, networking opportunities to meet agents and editors, and a ticket to the VIP. Additionally, we are thrilled to offer stipends to select applicants: parents who require financial assistance with childcare and out of town attendees in need of travel assistance. Please indicate if you would like to be considered for any of these stipends. Applications due 5/31/16. For more information & to apply, visit nyc.bindercon.com/apply-scholarship/.

“Firsts” at Pankhearst – anthology edited by Tee Tyson. Firsts is now taking narrative/creative non-fiction pieces of 5,000 words or less about first experiences. Which first time you write about is entirely up to you, but we hear sex, drugs, and rock & roll sell well. Tell us about your first piercing, your first tattoo, your first broken-heart, your first period, your first bout of chemo. Tell us about anything that meant so much to you that you still remember it deep down in your bones. Tell us about something that still makes you laugh. Or hide your face in shame. Submissions due 6/30/16. Read more & submit at pankhearst.wordpress.com.

“90s Pop Culture” at Up the Staircase Quarterly – special themed annual issue. We are seeking poetry and artwork involving and inspired by 90s music, TV shows, movies, fashion, games, technology, food & drink, and trends. Beginning in January, UtSQ will provide editors’ favorites and weekly writing prompts. Submissions due 7/1/16. Read more & submit at  upthestaircase.org.

Open Reading Period at Sundress Publications. Sundress looking for manuscripts of forty-eight to eighty (48-80) single-spaced pages of poetry. Individual pieces or selections may have been previously published in anthologies, chapbooks, print journals, online journals, etc., but cannot have appeared in any full-length collection, including self-published collections. Single-author and collaborative author manuscripts will be considered. All authors are welcome. Sundress is actively seeking collections from writers of color, trans and gender-nonconforming writers, writers with disabilities, and others whose voices are underrepresented in literary publishing. Submissions due 7/31/16. Read the full guidelines at sundresspublications.com.

And don’t forget to submit to one of our Sister Journals!

Pretty Owl PoetryPretty Owl Poetry is open year-round for submissions of poetry, fiction, and art. Pretty Owl Poetry is an online quarterly journal that publishes new, emerging, and established writers in poetry, fiction, and the visual arts. We support all approaches to writing, be it collaborative or individual. We’re interested in experimental and traditional forms and flash fiction masquerading as poetry, all with a lyrical quality. Please submit all work through our submissions manager, which can be found on our website: prettyowlpoetry.com.

wickedalicemainFounded in 2001, wicked alice is an online journal dedicated to women-centered writing and art. Published under the auspices of dancing girl press & studio and a member of Sundress Publications, the journal seeks to publish work that is fresh, innovative & exciting in a number of creative genres, including poetry, fiction, essays, visual art, multimedia, & hybrid works. Full guidelines can be found at wickedalicezine.tumblr.com.

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New Weekly Feature – TEEN TUESDAYS – Open Submission Call

Here at cahoodaloodaling we believe that young voices are an important part of our creative community!

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We are starting up a new weekly feature through our Facebook page, #TeenTuesdays, to celebrate these voices. Unlike our quarterly issues, #TeenTuesdays will not be themed—any topic is fine with us as long as it’s your best work and you’re no older than 19-years-old.

For information on submitting, read our guidelines here.

 

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Issue #20 – Trigger Warning

 

Trigger Warning Cover cropped

noun: A brief statement alerting a reader, listener, or viewer
to troubling or traumatic content ahead.

Because of the triggering content of this issue, we have published it as a PDF, which you are welcome to redistribute in its entirety. To download and read the issue, click on the image above. Take your time. Practice self care. Be well.

Thank you to our contributors and everyone who submitted for your immense bravery and honesty, and your willingness to share such intensely personal and often painful experiences with us. We are deeply honored.

Featuring work by: Eunice Andrada, Allison Austad, Elliott batTzedek, Heather Bell, Majnun Ben-David, Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Tomas Bird, Emma Bleker, Carl Boon, Imaani Cain, Marina Carreira, Lisa D. Chavez, Hannah Clark, Martha Clarkson, Ryder Collins, Cameron Conner, Melina Coogan, Krista Cox, Vanessa Crofskey, Sally Deskins, Marta Djekic, Liz Dolan, Tyler Earls, Kari Ann Ebert, Melissa Eleftherion, Samantha Fortenberry, Siaara Freeman, Kate Garrett, Karolyn Gehrig, David Gillette, Karrie Higgins, Sophia Jakab, Janne Karlsson, Norman Klein, Dorian Kotsiopoulos, Katia Kozachok, Shawn LaSota, Lili Leader-Williams, MANDEM, JM Miller, Lakshmi Mitra, Jennifer Parks, Dustin Pearson, Simon Perchik, Alison Rumfitt, Michael Russell, Barbara Ruth, Carla Sarett, W. Jack Savage, Elaine Schleiffer, Marian Kaplun Shapiro, Rajendra Shepherd, Meghan Trask Smith, Anthony Spaeth, Meghan Sterling, Carissa L. Stevens, Mary Stone, Ani Tascian, Anne Thériault, AJ Urquidi, Clementine von Radics, Elaine Wang, Sam Herschel Wein, Jerry Wemple, and Scott Wozniak.

 

Internet exclusive: from DV Grey by Karolyn Gehrig

Reviews

 

Interested in joining our eclectic family of staff?
We have several positions open.


Meggie

 

Meggie Royer is an artist and writer from the Midwest. She is the founder of literary magazine Persephone’s Daughters and has had poems in Words Dance, The Harpoon Review, and more. In 2013, she won the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ gold medal for poetry and the silver medal for her writing portfolio. She was also an Honorable Mention recipient of the 2015 Academy of American Poets Student Poetry Prize. Read our interview with Meggie.

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Join Our Staff!

cahoodaloodaling banner 2015

cahoodaloodaling is an online quarterly journal founded in 2012. We publish in the months of January, April, July, and October. As a collaborative journal, our quarterly issues are shaped by an eclectic staff and a revolving guest editor. Our calls for submissions, molded by our guest editors, are based on either a theme or a writing style. As such, our issues are ever-changing and our style ever-evolving. New team members will have opportunities to interact and work with other members of our international staff, as well as our contributors and guest editors. We are looking for diverse voices to add to our staff in several positions, including Production Editor, Special Feature Editor, Social Media Maven, Book Reviewer, and Book Review Editor.

Minimum age requirement for all positions is 16; no maximum. Being bilingual or a polyglot is a plus, but not a requirement. Individuals working inside or outside of academia are welcome. You are welcome to think of these positions as an internship and I am happy, as managing editor, to write letters of recommendation for any staff who performs their duties.

We are a collaborative publication and are looking for individuals who, beyond their specified duties, engage in our creative community. All members are added to our Facebook group and offer feedback and input as a team. We hope that by extending our staff, we can grow both as a journal and as individuals.

We believe that experiencing publishing from both working behind the scenes at a journal and by submitting to journals is important for our team members. For editor positions, we do require that applicants have published work prior to applying.

 

AVAILABLE POSITIONS

Production Editor

We are seeking to fill one Production Editor position. Production Editor will work directly under managing editor, Raquel Thorne.

Our Production Editor will be responsible for building pages for each issue. As such, our PE must have excellent WordPress.org skills. We are looking for a creative and visual individual to help translate our accepted submissions to our online platform. Must work well under deadlines, as the turn-around from final cuts to issue publication are at most 6 weeks, and at times up to a few days, before an issue goes live. Although PEs are not responsible for the bulk of editing, copyediting skills are a must as our PE will be last in line for reviewing work before it goes live.

Position is a minimum one year/four issue commitment.

 

Special Feature Editor(s)

We seek to fill one to two Special Feature Editor positions to work directly with our managing editor, Raquel Thorne. Special Feature Editor(s) will be responsible for maintaining our special feature gmail account and incoming proposals as well as soliciting work for special features. As our tastes are eclectic, so are our special features, which may take the form of community projects, collaborations, round tables, etc. SFE will pitch ideas to managing editor, Raquel Thorne, but will have much creative control over what they publish.

We are interested in bridging gaps in our creative community, between what is considered “literary” and that which is considered “not,” as well as supporting under-represented voices and producing a safe space for our eclectic, and often marginalized, creative community. Previous special features have included collaborative projects from writing groups to showcasing work from a super hero universe.

We are looking for self-starters. Applicants must be able to meet deadlines and have experience working with WordPress.org sites. Reliable computer access and an internet connection is a must.

Position is a minimum one year/four special feature commitment.

 

Social Media Maven

Our Social Media Maven will be responsible for promoting our published work on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. We are seeking someone who is familiar with these platforms, and who can help us promote our brand. Ideally, we want someone who can redesign our Tumblr to help us reach a broader audience. We do not have, but are open, to developing an Instagram presence and reviving our Ello account. Reliable computer access and an internet connection is a must. If you are also familiar with additional platforms, please let us know.

Position is a minimum six month requirement. Most duties will be required in the month following issue publication.

 

Book Reviewer/Book Review Editor

We are seeking 1-3 dedicated book reviewers. At cahoodaloodaling we accept unsolicited book review requests. Reviewers would select books from our requests and are expected to give honest reviews.

If you are interested in being our Book Review Editor, please indicate so in your application. Our BRE would be responsible for working with our staff, including readers who also may elect to do reviews, and as such would be responsible for line editing.

Position is a minimum six month/two issue commitment for reviewers, or a one year/four issue commitment for editors.

 

Additional roles may be created to suit excess, promising applicants. All positions at cahoodaloodaling are unpaid. Prior to applying, please read our current issue on our front page cahoodaloodaling.com.

 

HOW TO APPLY

To apply for a position, email Managing Editor Raquel Thorne at cahoodaloodaling@gmail.com with the position you’re applying for in the subject line, and address the following questions:

The basics: Name and preferred pronouns, as well as location (timezone). Also feel free to tell us any demographic information you feel comfortable sharing, which can include disability, age, ethnicity, religion, political party, etc. I assure you, we are open to anyone but Trump supporters. Do not feel the need to share anything you are not comfortable sharing.

What does good literary citizenship mean to you?

What is your specialty/specialties? Poetry, Fiction, Nonfction, Hybrid, Visual Artist, etc.

Please tell us who you are both inside and outside of the literary community (250-500 words). Also use this as a space to also link us to previous work you have published, including personal blogs, or any work that is applicable to the position for which you are applying.

What are your personal prejudices? As an example: Raquel Thorne, the managing editor, is strongly prejudiced against work that sentimentalizes individuals as “angels”. And ghost metaphors. But all the dinosaur poems get her vote.

Do you have any special skills you can bring to our group? For example, do you know how to set up advertising on our site and find appropriate advertisers (to our mission/creative community)? Or, do you know how to set up Google Translate so that we can reach a broader audience?

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Interview with Guest Editor Meggie Royer

Rhiannon Thorne TRARaquel Thorne: First, I want to say thank you Meggie for working on this issue for us. Personally, while it has been extremely rewarding, I have been finding that the work has produced a mixed set of emotions for me—from feelings of cathartic release through tears and gratitude for our creative community’s trust, to anger and shock at bearing witnessing their myriad of triggering experiences, and everything in between. What has editing our Trigger Warning issue been like for you?

MeggieMeggie Royer: Thank you, Raquel. Editing this issue has been a pleasure, and I’m so grateful to have been a part of it. I also felt enormous gratitude at our contributors’ willingness to share such painful and intimate experiences with us, and to trust us with keeping them safe and in good hands. A good deal of what I felt while editing this issue can best be summed up as awe: awe, particularly, at the ability of individuals who have experienced things most of us could never imagine to turn those experiences into something not only moving, but sometimes even beautiful. Anger was also a key emotion in my editing of this issue. I feel anger not only at the life circumstances that led to our contributors’ various traumas, and at the perpetrators who enacted those traumas, but also at the fact that many of our contributors had never been able to share their stories until now, or felt as if they couldn’t. I feel incredibly proud of cahoodaloodaling and this issue for taking an important step in helping people fight against the silence they feel that they have to maintain about their traumas (whether through shame or threats from perpetrators, etc.). I’m proud of our contributors, and I’m proud of us.

RT: I am a big fan of Words Dance Publishing, who publishes a lot of important and innovative work. Your full length, The No You Never Listened To, published by them last year, is a volume I deeply believe in. Can you talk to us a little about your experiences writing, compiling, and finalizing this volume? Also, what was it like working with Amanda Oaks? And, for those seeking a home for their own transformative work, what suggestions do you have? (And please share a poem from the collection with us.)

MR: Writing The No You Never Listened To was an experience unlike one I’d ever really had until that point. As one might imagine, the most difficult part of publishing the volume was writing it. Sexual violence is something that lends itself so easily to shame and embarrassment, and often to denial. Writing the volume was painful, because it forced me to return to memories I tried so hard to keep down, but it also did something powerful: it reminded me, and reinforced, that what was done to me did happen, that it mattered, that it will always matter, and that my truth is the only truth that exists, and the only one that matters. Actually finalizing the volume and sending the final manuscript off to Amanda was thrilling and terrifying, because it signified that my story was about to be told, in full, for the first time.

I have never once regretted writing the volume or working with Amanda. I remember the day it was released, a friend of my rapist who had supported me for quite a long time contacted me to say he didn’t believe it was right to “profit financially and artistically off of something that may or may not have happened.” Needless to say, that was the end of that friendship, but honestly, working with Amanda made the severing of that tie so much easier. Her constant support and empathy reminded me that writing out a trauma is never, ever self-indulgent or conceited or wrong or laughable. The day the book came out, Amanda contacted me to say she knew it would be a difficult day full of a great deal of emotion, and that she was there if I needed to discuss anything or someone to turn to. That idea reinforced that there will always be someone who believes survivors, despite the overwhelming number who don’t. In all honesty, Amanda was more of a friend than my former, disbelieving friend ever was. And that mix of business partnership and friendship is so important in publishing.

As far as advice for those seeking a home for their own work goes, especially work about trauma, I would say this: Choose someone to work with who lets you go at your own pace. If a publisher or agent is ever trying to rush you into creating something too quickly, or isn’t sensitive to your own needs, drop them. A publishing partnership should be mutually beneficial. If you feel stretched or overwhelmed and whoever you’re working with refuses to work around that stress, then it’s probably not a good idea to continue with them. Also, if you’re working on a book or project that is centered around trauma, the actual experience of working with the publisher who will publish that book or project should never, ever be more traumatic than the topic of the work itself.

I would love for you to share this poem from the collection:

Daughter by Meggie Royer

Republished from Words Dance

RT: Last year you also founded the online literary magazine, Persephone’s Daughters, a “lit magazine dedicated to empowering women who have experienced various forms of abuse and degradation.” I know as an editor it’s hard to pick favorites (making those final cuts are hard enough!) but can you share a few of the pieces which most moved you, or were most personally transformative for you?

MR:Sati” by Aarohi Narain
Witch Trial” by Kelsey Schmitt
You Can Be As Clean As You Want to Be” by Kiki Nicole
Persephone” by Kathie Rogers

I was moved by these pieces by the way some of them, especially “Sati” and “Witch Trial” combined elements of historical narratives with the present, offering an enchanting and angering timeline of the way women have been treated throughout history. Kiki’s piece is so familiar, almost comforting, in the way it presents the reader with ordinary details of a life disrupted, and the way the owner of that life copes with this disruption. And “Persephone,” well, it was everything I wanted out of an art piece for my first issue. A lot of people mistakenly believe that the story of Persephone and Hades is a love story. It’s not. It’s a story of abduction and deceit, and Kathie’s art depicts Persephone’s trials beautifully and creatively through the eyes of her model.

 

Trigger Warning will be published April 30th.

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Now on Tap: Submission Calls March 2016

Home Brews

Homebrew: Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

For our summer issue we want to read e-chapbooks published from January 2014 to May 2016. Self published is okay, but each chapbook must be available for download online through a publisher or personal website. Chapbooks that are not currently available online do not qualify. We are not interested in your unpublished manuscripts at this time.

SUBMIT ONE CHAPBOOK ONLY. All members of our staff will be reading cover letters this issue—think of it as your back cover. Get our attention with 50-150 words describing your chapbook, a biography, and a link to where your chapbook may be purchased or downloaded online.

Selected e-chapbooks will be showcased in July with a mini review by one of our staff members and a mini feature of selected work (2-3 poems; 1-10 pages of prose).

Submissions due 6/11/16.  Issue live 7/31/16.

 

 

Guest Taps

OUTSpoken by Sundress Academy for the Arts
LGBTQ writers from all over the country can submit a wide range of work to OUTSpoken, including poetry, nonfiction, spoken word, and video submissions of a monologue, dramatic piece, or film.  Writers can submit up to three poems, 1,200 words of prose, or five minutes of performance or film clips. Winners will receive publication in Stirring: A Literary Collection and free admission to the June, 2016 OUTSpoken performance in Knoxville. All submissions should be sent with third-person bio to outspoken@sundresspublications.com. Submissions due 3/31/16. For more information on OUTSpoken, visit sundresspublications.com.

“Curious Specimens” at Sundress Publications – edited by Jennifer Hanks. Wunderkammer-themed e-anthology. We want your Wonder Room’s creepiest inhabitants—think the Mütter Museum, reanimated Fiji Mermaids, and all creatures caught between life and death. While we’d love to see your poetry and flash fiction, we also welcome ephemera. Send us excerpts from taxidermy pamphlets, specimen lists, and medical notes. May your most unsettling work find a home with us: bottled, hand-labeled, and doused in formaldehyde. Please submit no more than 3-5 poems or 2 flash fiction pieces as an attachment to anthology@sundresspublications.com with the subject line Curious Specimens_LAST NAME. Include a brief cover letter and bio. Submissions due 4/1/16. For more information, visit sundresspublications.com.

“Deranged” at Pankhearst – edited by Kate Garrett and Rachel Nix
Deranged needs poetry about breaking rules, gender nonconformity, and/or women (cis or trans, we don’t care) in the arts who have done those things down the centuries. We don’t care if you personally identify as female, male, cis, trans, non-binary, or none of the above. Yes, the “deranged” comment was very generally thrown at women who write poems, but as far as we’re concerned, everyone should be breaking social rules and feeling free to ignore the concept of “normal”. This isn’t an -ist/ism/y anthology, unless creative anarchy counts. People doing what’s expected of them and fitting into boxes, regardless of gender identity, is part of the problem. Submit 1-6 poems by email. Submissions due 4/29/16. For more information, and to submit, visit pankhearst.wordpress.com.

“90s Pop Culture” at Up the Staircase Quarterly – special themed annual issue. We are seeking poetry and artwork involving and inspired by 90s music, TV shows, movies, fashion, games, technology, food & drink, and trends. Beginning in January, UtSQ will provide editors’ favorites and weekly writing prompts. Submissions due 7/1/16. Read more & submit at upthestaircase.org.

 

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