Join Our Staff!

cahoodaloodaling banner 2015

cahoodaloodaling is an online quarterly journal founded in 2012. We publish in the months of January, April, July, and October. As a collaborative journal, our quarterly issues are shaped by an eclectic staff and a revolving guest editor. Our calls for submissions, molded by our guest editors, are based on either a theme or a writing style. As such, our issues are ever-changing and our style ever-evolving. New team members will have opportunities to interact and work with other members of our international staff, as well as our contributors and guest editors. We are looking for diverse voices to add to our staff in several positions, including Production Editor, Special Feature Editor, Social Media Maven, Book Reviewer, and Book Review Editor.

Minimum age requirement for all positions is 16; no maximum. Being bilingual or a polyglot is a plus, but not a requirement. Individuals working inside or outside of academia are welcome. You are welcome to think of these positions as an internship and I am happy, as managing editor, to write letters of recommendation for any staff who performs their duties.

We are a collaborative publication and are looking for individuals who, beyond their specified duties, engage in our creative community. All members are added to our Facebook group and offer feedback and input as a team. We hope that by extending our staff, we can grow both as a journal and as individuals.

We believe that experiencing publishing from both working behind the scenes at a journal and by submitting to journals is important for our team members. For editor positions, we do require that applicants have published work prior to applying.

 

AVAILABLE POSITIONS

Production Editor

We are seeking to fill one Production Editor position. Production Editor will work directly under managing editor, Raquel Thorne.

Our Production Editor will be responsible for building pages for each issue. As such, our PE must have excellent WordPress.org skills. We are looking for a creative and visual individual to help translate our accepted submissions to our online platform. Must work well under deadlines, as the turn-around from final cuts to issue publication are at most 6 weeks, and at times up to a few days, before an issue goes live. Although PEs are not responsible for the bulk of editing, copyediting skills are a must as our PE will be last in line for reviewing work before it goes live.

Position is a minimum one year/four issue commitment.

 

Special Feature Editor(s)

We seek to fill one to two Special Feature Editor positions to work directly with our managing editor, Raquel Thorne. Special Feature Editor(s) will be responsible for maintaining our special feature gmail account and incoming proposals as well as soliciting work for special features. As our tastes are eclectic, so are our special features, which may take the form of community projects, collaborations, round tables, etc. SFE will pitch ideas to managing editor, Raquel Thorne, but will have much creative control over what they publish.

We are interested in bridging gaps in our creative community, between what is considered “literary” and that which is considered “not,” as well as supporting under-represented voices and producing a safe space for our eclectic, and often marginalized, creative community. Previous special features have included collaborative projects from writing groups to showcasing work from a super hero universe.

We are looking for self-starters. Applicants must be able to meet deadlines and have experience working with WordPress.org sites. Reliable computer access and an internet connection is a must.

Position is a minimum one year/four special feature commitment.

 

Social Media Maven

Our Social Media Maven will be responsible for promoting our published work on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. We are seeking someone who is familiar with these platforms, and who can help us promote our brand. Ideally, we want someone who can redesign our Tumblr to help us reach a broader audience. We do not have, but are open, to developing an Instagram presence and reviving our Ello account. Reliable computer access and an internet connection is a must. If you are also familiar with additional platforms, please let us know.

Position is a minimum six month requirement. Most duties will be required in the month following issue publication.

 

Book Reviewer/Book Review Editor

We are seeking 1-3 dedicated book reviewers. At cahoodaloodaling we accept unsolicited book review requests. Reviewers would select books from our requests and are expected to give honest reviews.

If you are interested in being our Book Review Editor, please indicate so in your application. Our BRE would be responsible for working with our staff, including readers who also may elect to do reviews, and as such would be responsible for line editing.

Position is a minimum six month/two issue commitment for reviewers, or a one year/four issue commitment for editors.

 

Additional roles may be created to suit excess, promising applicants. All positions at cahoodaloodaling are unpaid. Prior to applying, please read our current issue on our front page cahoodaloodaling.com.

 

HOW TO APPLY

To apply for a position, email Managing Editor Raquel Thorne at cahoodaloodaling@gmail.com with the position you’re applying for in the subject line, and address the following questions:

The basics: Name and preferred pronouns, as well as location (timezone). Also feel free to tell us any demographic information you feel comfortable sharing, which can include disability, age, ethnicity, religion, political party, etc. I assure you, we are open to anyone but Trump supporters. Do not feel the need to share anything you are not comfortable sharing.

What does good literary citizenship mean to you?

What is your specialty/specialties? Poetry, Fiction, Nonfction, Hybrid, Visual Artist, etc.

Please tell us who you are both inside and outside of the literary community (250-500 words). Also use this as a space to also link us to previous work you have published, including personal blogs, or any work that is applicable to the position for which you are applying.

What are your personal prejudices? As an example: Raquel Thorne, the managing editor, is strongly prejudiced against work that sentimentalizes individuals as “angels”. And ghost metaphors. But all the dinosaur poems get her vote.

Do you have any special skills you can bring to our group? For example, do you know how to set up advertising on our site and find appropriate advertisers (to our mission/creative community)? Or, do you know how to set up Google Translate so that we can reach a broader audience?

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Interview with Guest Editor Meggie Royer

Rhiannon Thorne TRARaquel Thorne: First, I want to say thank you Meggie for working on this issue for us. Personally, while it has been extremely rewarding, I have been finding that the work has produced a mixed set of emotions for me—from feelings of cathartic release through tears and gratitude for our creative community’s trust, to anger and shock at bearing witnessing their myriad of triggering experiences, and everything in between. What has editing our Trigger Warning issue been like for you?

MeggieMeggie Royer: Thank you, Raquel. Editing this issue has been a pleasure, and I’m so grateful to have been a part of it. I also felt enormous gratitude at our contributors’ willingness to share such painful and intimate experiences with us, and to trust us with keeping them safe and in good hands. A good deal of what I felt while editing this issue can best be summed up as awe: awe, particularly, at the ability of individuals who have experienced things most of us could never imagine to turn those experiences into something not only moving, but sometimes even beautiful. Anger was also a key emotion in my editing of this issue. I feel anger not only at the life circumstances that led to our contributors’ various traumas, and at the perpetrators who enacted those traumas, but also at the fact that many of our contributors had never been able to share their stories until now, or felt as if they couldn’t. I feel incredibly proud of cahoodaloodaling and this issue for taking an important step in helping people fight against the silence they feel that they have to maintain about their traumas (whether through shame or threats from perpetrators, etc.). I’m proud of our contributors, and I’m proud of us.

RT: I am a big fan of Words Dance Publishing, who publishes a lot of important and innovative work. Your full length, The No You Never Listened To, published by them last year, is a volume I deeply believe in. Can you talk to us a little about your experiences writing, compiling, and finalizing this volume? Also, what was it like working with Amanda Oaks? And, for those seeking a home for their own transformative work, what suggestions do you have? (And please share a poem from the collection with us.)

MR: Writing The No You Never Listened To was an experience unlike one I’d ever really had until that point. As one might imagine, the most difficult part of publishing the volume was writing it. Sexual violence is something that lends itself so easily to shame and embarrassment, and often to denial. Writing the volume was painful, because it forced me to return to memories I tried so hard to keep down, but it also did something powerful: it reminded me, and reinforced, that what was done to me did happen, that it mattered, that it will always matter, and that my truth is the only truth that exists, and the only one that matters. Actually finalizing the volume and sending the final manuscript off to Amanda was thrilling and terrifying, because it signified that my story was about to be told, in full, for the first time.

I have never once regretted writing the volume or working with Amanda. I remember the day it was released, a friend of my rapist who had supported me for quite a long time contacted me to say he didn’t believe it was right to “profit financially and artistically off of something that may or may not have happened.” Needless to say, that was the end of that friendship, but honestly, working with Amanda made the severing of that tie so much easier. Her constant support and empathy reminded me that writing out a trauma is never, ever self-indulgent or conceited or wrong or laughable. The day the book came out, Amanda contacted me to say she knew it would be a difficult day full of a great deal of emotion, and that she was there if I needed to discuss anything or someone to turn to. That idea reinforced that there will always be someone who believes survivors, despite the overwhelming number who don’t. In all honesty, Amanda was more of a friend than my former, disbelieving friend ever was. And that mix of business partnership and friendship is so important in publishing.

As far as advice for those seeking a home for their own work goes, especially work about trauma, I would say this: Choose someone to work with who lets you go at your own pace. If a publisher or agent is ever trying to rush you into creating something too quickly, or isn’t sensitive to your own needs, drop them. A publishing partnership should be mutually beneficial. If you feel stretched or overwhelmed and whoever you’re working with refuses to work around that stress, then it’s probably not a good idea to continue with them. Also, if you’re working on a book or project that is centered around trauma, the actual experience of working with the publisher who will publish that book or project should never, ever be more traumatic than the topic of the work itself.

I would love for you to share this poem from the collection:

Daughter by Meggie Royer

Republished from Words Dance

RT: Last year you also founded the online literary magazine, Persephone’s Daughters, a “lit magazine dedicated to empowering women who have experienced various forms of abuse and degradation.” I know as an editor it’s hard to pick favorites (making those final cuts are hard enough!) but can you share a few of the pieces which most moved you, or were most personally transformative for you?

MR:Sati” by Aarohi Narain
Witch Trial” by Kelsey Schmitt
You Can Be As Clean As You Want to Be” by Kiki Nicole
Persephone” by Kathie Rogers

I was moved by these pieces by the way some of them, especially “Sati” and “Witch Trial” combined elements of historical narratives with the present, offering an enchanting and angering timeline of the way women have been treated throughout history. Kiki’s piece is so familiar, almost comforting, in the way it presents the reader with ordinary details of a life disrupted, and the way the owner of that life copes with this disruption. And “Persephone,” well, it was everything I wanted out of an art piece for my first issue. A lot of people mistakenly believe that the story of Persephone and Hades is a love story. It’s not. It’s a story of abduction and deceit, and Kathie’s art depicts Persephone’s trials beautifully and creatively through the eyes of her model.

 

Trigger Warning will be published April 30th.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Now on Tap: Submission Calls March 2016

Home Brews

Homebrew: Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

For our summer issue we want to read e-chapbooks published from January 2014 to May 2016. Self published is okay, but each chapbook must be available for download online through a publisher or personal website. Chapbooks that are not currently available online do not qualify. We are not interested in your unpublished manuscripts at this time.

SUBMIT ONE CHAPBOOK ONLY. All members of our staff will be reading cover letters this issue—think of it as your back cover. Get our attention with 50-150 words describing your chapbook, a biography, and a link to where your chapbook may be purchased or downloaded online.

Selected e-chapbooks will be showcased in July with a mini review by one of our staff members and a mini feature of selected work (2-3 poems; 1-10 pages of prose).

Submissions due 6/11/16.  Issue live 7/31/16.

 

 

Guest Taps

OUTSpoken by Sundress Academy for the Arts
LGBTQ writers from all over the country can submit a wide range of work to OUTSpoken, including poetry, nonfiction, spoken word, and video submissions of a monologue, dramatic piece, or film.  Writers can submit up to three poems, 1,200 words of prose, or five minutes of performance or film clips. Winners will receive publication in Stirring: A Literary Collection and free admission to the June, 2016 OUTSpoken performance in Knoxville. All submissions should be sent with third-person bio to outspoken@sundresspublications.com. Submissions due 3/31/16. For more information on OUTSpoken, visit sundresspublications.com.

“Curious Specimens” at Sundress Publications – edited by Jennifer Hanks. Wunderkammer-themed e-anthology. We want your Wonder Room’s creepiest inhabitants—think the Mütter Museum, reanimated Fiji Mermaids, and all creatures caught between life and death. While we’d love to see your poetry and flash fiction, we also welcome ephemera. Send us excerpts from taxidermy pamphlets, specimen lists, and medical notes. May your most unsettling work find a home with us: bottled, hand-labeled, and doused in formaldehyde. Please submit no more than 3-5 poems or 2 flash fiction pieces as an attachment to anthology@sundresspublications.com with the subject line Curious Specimens_LAST NAME. Include a brief cover letter and bio. Submissions due 4/1/16. For more information, visit sundresspublications.com.

“Deranged” at Pankhearst – edited by Kate Garrett and Rachel Nix
Deranged needs poetry about breaking rules, gender nonconformity, and/or women (cis or trans, we don’t care) in the arts who have done those things down the centuries. We don’t care if you personally identify as female, male, cis, trans, non-binary, or none of the above. Yes, the “deranged” comment was very generally thrown at women who write poems, but as far as we’re concerned, everyone should be breaking social rules and feeling free to ignore the concept of “normal”. This isn’t an -ist/ism/y anthology, unless creative anarchy counts. People doing what’s expected of them and fitting into boxes, regardless of gender identity, is part of the problem. Submit 1-6 poems by email. Submissions due 4/29/16. For more information, and to submit, visit pankhearst.wordpress.com.

“90s Pop Culture” at Up the Staircase Quarterly – special themed annual issue. We are seeking poetry and artwork involving and inspired by 90s music, TV shows, movies, fashion, games, technology, food & drink, and trends. Beginning in January, UtSQ will provide editors’ favorites and weekly writing prompts. Submissions due 7/1/16. Read more & submit at upthestaircase.org.

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

New Staff Member! Tiegan Dakin, Feature Contributor

Tiegan Dakincahoodaloodaling is excited to announce that Tiegan Dakin is joining our staff as a feature contributor! Tiegan will be curating a quarterly interview series of spoken word poets focused on poetry which does important work with social injustices. Look for her first interview in our upcoming issue, Trigger Warning, due out April 20th!

Tiegan Dakin is an emerging teenage writer and artist currently residing in Australia. Her work has previously appeared in Blue Bonnet Review, Squawk Back, The Legendary, and Gravel Literary Journal. She has also been shortlisted for the Poetry Object 2014 and 2015 contests.

Tiegan blogs on her blog, Harbour, and writes articles for Perth-based Avenoir Magazine in between her studies.

If she’s not sitting in front of her computer at home, you will probably find Tiegan riding her bike around town or visiting the local library to borrow books like I’m Watching You by Karen Rose, or a more challenging literary classic.

Brenda Shaughnessy’s poem, “Artless,” perfectly sums up her life story.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

PPP&P #1 Winter 2016

PPP&P3

PPP&P will spotlight work from our sister journals at Sundress Publications: Pretty Owl Poetry, Rogue Agent, Stirring, and Wicked Alice. Much like the astrology practiced in Telangana in which a parrot is used to pick some cards as luck for the customer, Prasanna hopes her picks will bring luck (and inspiration) to our readers.

 

Rogue Agent

Jim Elledge’s “Identifying the Dead begins with enumerated bodies, fragile like a just beginning-to-fall house-of-cards, with fire as the Domino wave starter, and then moves neatly onto lined-up ‘clothing and personal effects’ and absent bodies. Because of the source—quotes from police reports, I was reminded of Robin Coste’s Voyage of the Sable Venus which is “a riveting narrative made up entirely of titles of artworks from ancient times to the present—titles that feature or in some way comment on the black female figure in Western art”.

Find a list or a report from the past that speaks to you and recreate the scene.

*

Up until reading Sonya Huber’s “What Pain Wants,” Eula Biss’s Pain Scale was the definitive word on pain for me. Hubert flips how how pain is viewed by making pain the subject and antihero of the poem.

Pain wants you to put in earplugs because sounds are grating.

Pain has something urgent to tell you but forgets over and over again what it was.

Flip your subject.

Stirring

If I hear a sound in the middle of the night, I wonder who’s up this late and what are they up to. And in a moment like that, Jessica Alderman’s poemLa Limpieza,” finds a parallel in a public tragedy that is likened to an everyday action: cleansing.

Crack open a Spanish dictionary and start off with a word whose sound you like.

*

It is not everyday that I read a poem that begins whose title is a science term.Half Life,” by Gretchen Miexner is perfectly titled, showing how a long poem can be tethered from the beginning to a singular idea, maintaining the reader’s focus. (With a good mix of alternating surrealism, this poem did not need the boost of an interesting title, but short form bias is the bane of digital age!)

Write a long poem with a scientific title that roots your poem to a singular idea.

 

Wicked Alice

Poetic snapshots, Kelsey O’Kelly’s “bad sangria(and others) take off from the here and now in this digital life, but end up in far reaching places like history and space. (Wait until she reaches Pluto!)

Write a cozy, earth nostalgic poem.

*

In her poems what to bring to a die-in” and “cajol,” Amber Flame’s genius lies in her smart use of limited anaphora for only part of each poem.

and if not your guns, then your wide screaming mouths
and if not your screaming mouths, then your gasping tears
and if not your tears, then your fist clenched in anger
and if not your fist, then your hands raised in surrender.

By repeating the phrasing ‘if not your ____ then your ____’ in the first and (‘let it …’ in the second), Flame melds a musical quality into her writing.

Use repetitive lines as a diving board to set the rhythm for your poem.

 

Pretty Owl Poetry

Recycling is a poem which shows an artist’s enthusiasm at learning a new concept. In this case, “Recycling” echos the new practice of Capsula Mundi while also echoing the traditional ideas of bodies returning to earth “ashes to ashes, dust to dust.” Even with a great rocket-like velocity, an idea needs more for that momentum to make the readers say ‘again,’ like a toddler does. Stephanie Cawley‘s poem manages this with contrasts like slant of light/mirrored curves:

pulp made not from trees but old atlases

But old atlases themselves were once made from paper, another stunning contrast. Recycling itself can result in contrast, depending on what is placed before/after.

Write a poem of contrasts

Write a poem of contrasts with enthusiasm for a new concept.

*

In Portrait of Girl Falling,” Emily Anne Hopkins crafts a cadence which lends additional meaning to words even when they are repeated consecutively.

She knew a girl who went blind
in this business. Lost balance.

The building up of rhythm is delightfully contrary to foreshadowed fall in the title.

Pick a hard sound like “B” or “P” for alliteration. Line up those drum soldiers and see what march your poem is capable of.

 

Feel free to share your responses to Prasanna’s prompts in the comments below!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

New Staff Member! Prasanna Surakanti, Feature Contributor

IMG_1215cahoodaloodaling is excited to announce that Prasanna Surakanti, from our third issue, is joining our staff as a feature contributor!

Prasanna’s work has previously appeared in Terracotta Typewriter, Ignite, Orion headless, Urban Confustions, Magic Cat Press, The Applicant, The BluePrint Review, Spillway, cahoodaloodaling, the anthology Something’s Brewing (Kind of a Hurricane Press, 2014), and the collaborative chapbook The Motion in Motive, among others.

Prasanna’s reader self is best summed up by the first few paragraphs of Ben Dolan’s essay, “Crafting a Nonfiction Ending When Your Subject Isn’t Dead Yet.”

When she is not tweeting about something great that she just read, she is looking for that something that prompts her to write. To find out how those missions end, read our review of her collection Family Forever.

If you are in the Baltimore area Mid Feb-March, her collaborative work with artist Janet Little Jeffers in The Light Ekphrastic will be on display at David Mikow Art Gallery.

 

PPP&P3

“Prasanna’s Parrot Picks & Prompts” will spotlight work from our sister journals at Sundress Publications: Pretty Owl Poetry, Rogue Agent, Stirring, and Wicked Alice.

Much like the astrology practiced in Telangana in which a parrot is used to pick some cards as luck for the customer, Prasanna hopes her picks will bring luck (and inspiration) to our readers.

Our first installment of “Prasanna’s Parrot Picks & Prompts” will be out at the end of the month!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Issue #19 – Writers Create: A Winter Makers’ Fair

When Kate Hammerich and I began cahoodaloodaling, we set out with some vague notion of the direction we would go—always towards and never away Read the full letter from the editor.

Writers Create Cover

Editor’s Spotlight: Flood by Molly Rideout

Call It Postmodernism by Sarah Bates & Dustin Michael

The Animation Room by Linda Kennedy

What’s Hidden by Lynn Hoffman

Giving Chocolate Raspberry Sauce: The Season to Give by Clinton Siegle

Brown Tissue Moth by Carrie Albert

Collage Undresses the Darkness by Bill Wolak

Unreadable by Allen Crawford

Circadian by Leonard Kogan

The Universe by Carol Smallwood

Fold and Gather by T.A. Noonan

Shirley Xu Interviews Cristiana Leone, Creator of Sunken

Rachel Nix Interviews Amanda Oaks of Words Dance

Our guest editor M. Mack is a genderqueer poet, editor, and fiber artist in Virginia. Ze is the author of the chapbooks Traveling (Hyacinth Girl Press, 2015) and Imaginary Kansas (dancing girl press, 2015), and the forthcoming collection Theater of Parts (Sundress Publications, 2016). Ze is a founding co-editor of Gazing Grain Press. Find hir at: mxmack.com.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Now on Tap: Submission Calls Jan. 2016

Home Brews

Just Tapped: Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

For our summer issue we want to read e-chapbooks published from January 2014 to May 2016. Self published is okay, but each chapbook must be available for download online through a publisher or personal website. Chapbooks that are not currently available online do not qualify. We are not interested in your unpublished manuscripts at this time.

SUBMIT ONE CHAPBOOK ONLY. All members of our staff will be reading cover letters this issue—think of it as your back cover. Get our attention with 50-150 words describing your chapbook, a biography, and a link to where your chapbook may be purchased or downloaded online.

Selected e-chapbooks will be showcased in July with a mini review by one of our staff members and a mini feature of selected work (2-3 poems; 1-10 pages of prose).

Submissions due 6/11/16.  Issue live 7/31/16.

 

Issue #20 – Trigger Warning

Paul Gilmartin once wrote, “I cannot stand small talk, because I feel like there’s an elephant standing in the room shitting all over everything and nobody is saying anything. I’m just dying to say, ‘Hey, do you ever feel like jumping off a bridge?’ or ‘Do you feel an emptiness inside your chest at night that is going to swallow you?’ But you can’t say that at a cocktail party.”

For this issue of cahoodaloodaling, we want you to send us your art and writing about everything you can’t say at a cocktail party. Send us your letters, your poems, your paintings, your drawings, your collages and essays. Send us your hearts. Send us what you’ve never been able to speak about, the things that wound you and threaten to bring you under.

This is a safe place. A place where you can let go of your secrets about anything at all that has triggered or traumatized you, be it abuse, an eating disorder, a miscarriage or abortion, monsters that hid beneath your bed in the form of humans. Sometimes it’s not an elephant in the room but another person, or a poem you can’t write, a piece of art you couldn’t create.

This issue is where you can put to rest all the times you felt like jumping off a bridge.

Submissions due 3/19/16. Guest editor Meggie Royer. Issue live 4/30/16.

 

Guest Taps

“Life During Wartime” at Pankhearst – edited by Evangeline Jennings. Anthology of prose only. No minimum length. A tentative maximum of 10,000 words. All stories must be set in America some time after the new President has taken office. Imagine a country run by Donald Trump, the Brothers Koch, and the Open Carry Mouthbreathers who think it all went wrong when people stopped whuppin’ slaves and women were allowed to wear shoes. The people who think the answer to school shootings is to give teachers guns. Imagine The Holy American Empire: black lives, brown lives, and poor lives don’t matter, and everybody knows and acts accordingly; you’re trying to raise a family, finding it harder every day, worrying perpetually about your monthly payments; you’re about to be put on the train “home”, even though you were born in Illinois. Yes, we’re talking immediate future dystopia blues. Submissions due 1/31/16. Read more & submit at pankhearst.wordpress.com.

“See Into the Dark” at Pankhearst – Slim Volume #4, edited by Kate Garrett. Anthology of poetry (40 lines or less) and flash fiction (750 words or less). Fear is something slightly different for all of us. This will be a book of oddities and causes for alarm. Serial killers? Ghosts? Demonic possessions? Monsters under the bed? Kafkaesque? Maybe you have a strangely creepy story or poem you wouldn’t consider horror at all. All okay, but as always, please keep realism involved in the proceedings: if you’re going to be otherworldly, make sure it could happen in this one. (No sparkly vampires.) Send up to 5 poems or 3 flash fictions – or a reasonable mix of the two. Submissions due 2/5/16. Read more & submit at pankhearst.wordpress.com.

Summer Artist Residencies at Firefly Farms – Sundress Academy for the Arts, Knoxville, TN. SAFTA is currently accepting applications for our summer residency period (May 30th to August 28th) for short-term artists’ residencies in creative writing, visual art, film/theater, music, and more. The SAFTA farmhouse is located on a working farm less than a half hour from downtown Knoxville, an exciting and creative city of 200,000 in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. Each residency includes a room of one’s own, access to a communal kitchen, bathroom, office, and living space, plus wireless internet and cable. The length of a residency can run from one to week to two months. Fellowships and scholarships are available those with financial need as well as writers and artists of color. Applications for summer residencies due 3/15/16. For more information and to apply, visit sundressacademyforthearts.com.

“Curious Specimens” at Sundress Publications – edited by Jennifer Hanks. Wunderkammer-themed e-anthology. We want your Wonder Room’s creepiest inhabitants—think the Mütter Museum, reanimated Fiji Mermaids, and all creatures caught between life and death. While we’d love to see your poetry and flash fiction, we also welcome ephemera. Send us excerpts from taxidermy pamphlets, specimen lists, and medical notes. May your most unsettling work find a home with us: bottled, hand-labeled, and doused in formaldehyde. Please submit no more than 3-5 poems or 2 flash fiction pieces as an attachment to anthology@sundresspublications.com with the subject line Curious Specimens_LAST NAME. Include a brief cover letter and bio. Submissions due 4/1/16. For more information, visit sundresspublications.com.

“90s Pop Culture” at Up the Staircase Quarterly – special themed annual issue. We are seeking poetry and artwork involving and inspired by 90s music, TV shows, movies, fashion, games, technology, food & drink, and trends. Beginning in January, UtSQ will provide editors’ favorites and weekly writing prompts. Submissions due 7/1/16. Read more & submit at upthestaircase.org.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

cahoodaloodaling joins Sundress’s Family of Journals!

In 2012 when we founded cahoodaloodaling as a space for artists to express themselves without boundaries, to transcend the idea of a “poem” and simply create, we were reading a lot of similarly themed pieces scattered around the net at different journals and thought, Hey, why not have that in one place, and connect these pieces through themed issues? Small and limited at first, we worked to expand our platform, establish our family, and open our doors to all artistic forms.

luggage-646311_1920

We are thrilled to announce that this holiday season cahoodaloodaling will be celebrating with our new extended family as part of Sundress Publications! 2015 was a big year for Sundress and we’re excited to be a part of it. Based out of Knoxville, TN, Sundress Publications is now home to several imprints, including the newly launched Agape Editions which celebrates works that embrace the mythical, Sundress Kids (you guessed it!), and Doubleback Books which rescues out-of-print books and returns them to print. Of course, we can’t forget Flaming Giblet Press, about to celebrate its 10th year of publishing experimental work which “pushes the boundaries of crucial” nor Sundress hosting its first full-length open reading period.

But you probably want to hear about our sister journals. Stirring: A Literary Collection, founded by Sundress Publications president Erin Elizabeth Smith in 1999, is one of the longest continually publishing online journals. Another sister, Wicked Alice, explores the female experience (all genders welcome!) while Rogue Agent investigates the experiences of the human body and Pretty Owl Poetry brings poetry to a live audience with their Spotlight Series.

As always, cahoodaloodaling will continue to invite unique writing, embrace hybrid and multimedia work, and celebrate collaboration.

A true family never stops growing, so from our family to yours, Happy Holidays!

Love,
Kate Hammerich & Raquel Thorne
Founding Editors

 

 

Find out more about Sundress’s other projects and Sundress Academy for the Arts at www.sundresspublications.com.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

New Staff Member! Michelle Panik, Lit Reader

A warm welcome to the newest member of our fiction/nonfiction team, Michelle Panik!

Michelle Panik 4Michelle Panik lives on the edge of California, in Carlsbad, with her husband and their kids. She’s previously worked as a publications coordinator, a freelance writer, an adult ESL teacher, and a middle- and high-school teacher. These days, she teaches her three-year-old twins to hunt for bugs and sing Indigo Girls songs. She has an MFA from the University of Maryland and a BA in Writing and Art History from UC San Diego. Her stories have been published in such journals as Alimentum, Concho River Review, Sierra Nevada Review, and SLAB.

We’re excited to have Michelle join our team as we work on our Writers Create: A Winter Makers’ Fair issue, out January 31st!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share