Category Archives: Issue

Issue #22 – Of Distance and Discord

What then are the seeds of non-spatial distance? That which isolates one from the world? The haunting pieces in cahoodaloodaling’s Winter 2017 edition attempt to unearth the answer…

Read the full guest editor letter from Sade Andria Zabala.

Of Distance and Discord Cover

Guest Editor’s Spotlight:
This Is a Serious Consideration by Megan Merchant

Ourland by Sue Hyon Bae

Drifting Across Town on the Top Deck by Vicky Waters

Wrong Number by Michael Brockley

Freeway Sex by Alexis Rhone Fancher

To Gorgeous, Love Sis by Chuck Nwoke

All-American Roommate by M. Wright

Kansas by Ana Prundaru

Elizabeth’s Request by Maggie Blake Bailey

Brieftrager by Robert Bharda Ward

Below the Line by Ryan Harper

How to Drive Across the Country by Vivian Wagner

No Eyes by Bonnie Jo Shufflebeam & Peter Brewer

L’aurore by Meg Drummond-Wilson

Tarots & Irony by Klarisse Medina

Our Escape by Diana Hurlburt

In-Season by Wendy Elizabeth Ingersoll

She Called Me a Dirty Jew by Phyllis Wax

The Favorite by Kelly Flynn

Some Place Not Here by Jessica Barksdale

Cover Art: Of Distance and Discord by Julie Chua

Rachel Nix Interviews Shinjini Bhattacharjee

Review of Dream Job: Wacky Adventures of an HR Manager by Janet Garber


About Our Guest Editor
Sade Andria ZabalaSade Andria Zabala is a Filipina mermaid living in Denmark.

She is the author of poetry books WAR SONGS and Coffee & Cigarettes (Thought Catalog Books, 2016). Her writing has appeared on Literary Orphans, Words Dance Publishing, Hooligan Magazine, and more.

When she’s not busy watching Survivor or having a knife fight with her anxiety, she writes for Thought Catalog. Follow her Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram.

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Issue #21 – Give It to Me E-gain: The Chapbook Review Issue

I adore chapbooks. Usually themed, they can simmer a story down to its bare emotional essentials, while at the same time displaying a keen sense of language. Like a full length collection, their forms of self-expression run the gamut from poetry to fiction to nonfiction and even hybrid works—all in a delightfully consumable-in-one-sitting package. In our Give It To Me E-gain issue you will find a sampling of this diversity, and like a chapbook, this spotlight of works selected by our staff is designed to be a brief read. Their impact though is anything but ephemeral.

Raquel Thorne

Give It to Me E-gain Final Cover

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The BureauThe Bureau
Les Kay

Poetry
30 pages
Sundress Publications (2015)
FREE pdf

On the conference call, Rimbaud complained
from Vladivostok that several ventures would suffer
languid sales and laughable costs if the training staff cannot
convey the softer side of capitalism

(from “An Apple That Falls”)

A narrative which is both disjunctive and invasive, The Bureau imagines a systemic corralling of the everyman in a world with a capitalist governmental run organization loves its populace into assuming compliant positions. While not quite detailing a dystopian, at least not from the viewpoint of our narrator, who may or may not be losing his mind, the manuscript is eerie and makes poignant connections to our own society. The Bureau is also playful, incorporating elements of magical realism and occasional humor with characters such as an iguana who consults, a boss who may or may not be Satan, and a Spanish-speaking collie, who is, after all, a bitch. Published in a typewriter font and incorporating redaction, the presentation is as smart as the writing.

Read excerpts from The Bureau

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Call It a PremonitionCall It a Premonition
Jess Feldman

Poetry
18 pages
BOAAT Press (2015)
FREE pdf

What is the Voynich Manuscript? A complex code, some lost language, or a hoax? (Or, as this reviewer previously believed, an excuse for a medieval doodler to draw fantastical plants, astronomical musings, and naked ladies bathing?) Voynich Manuscrit Naked Bathing

By offering us a translation, Call It a Premonition does what scientists, linguists, and even a team of WWII code breakers have not been able to do. Feldman’s author of the Voynich Manuscript is a young woman growing up in the 1400s and an avid diary keeper. Starting with an account of how “sir gawain won’t look at me/ even though I wore my best frock,” this wildly charming echap, full of smart side-eye, walks the line between the gender expectations of middle ages and a modern feminist lens.

Read excerpts from Call It a Premonition

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Forensic ForagingForensic Foraging with Crawdaddy
Cover Artist William C. Crawford

These photos embody the forensic foraging technique of photography Crawford developed with his colleague, Sydney lensman, Jim Provencher. Whether in color or black and white, they feature extensive shooting of everything encountered, bringing Main Street Americana and abroad alive in their most base, everyday state. The images are then selectively presented with heavy contrast and saturation, with minimal computer manipulation. This genre borrows heavily from Stephen Shore and his color post cards from Amarillo, as well as the photographic DNA of Walker Evans on the move (foraging?). Read more about this technique in the essay “Forensic Foraging Embraces Minimalist Throwback Techniques To Unlock An Evolving Photographic Genre,” co-authored by Provencher.

View Art Feature

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In the Voice of a Minor SaintIn the Voice of a Minor Saint
Sarah J. Sloat

Poetry
38 pages
Sundress Publications (reprint 2016; originally published Tilt Press 2009)
FREE pdf

If the moon comes out bearing nicks and bite marks,
you’ll find me smoothing my skin of its cares tonight.

Under a halo the size of a ring, the old
arguments sit splitting their oldest hairs tonight.

Look at me crooked. Mistake me for Eve. If looks
deceive, who knows which mask our maker wears tonight?

(from “Ghazal with Heavenly Bodies”)

In the Voice of a Minor Saint highlights the extraordinary in ordinary moments: the golden of a shaft of wheat, the heavy buzzing of bees at the end of summer, the sadness of a barren womb. Her language is rich and musical, never overbearing and always tonal. Sloat gives voice to the forgotten, the disenchanting, the wallflower of the world; she unwraps her universe carefully and lovingly. Each poem is always delicately woven, each word carefully picked; it is difficult not to be moved and charmed by the recurring themes and feelings conveyed in this book, not to elevate to sainthood what may seem insignificant. I was delighted to discover not one but two Ghazals in the folds of this chapbook, a form we do not often seeone more minor saint brought to our attention by Sloat’s clever writing.

Read excerpts from In the Voice of a Minor Saint

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The Marriage BedThe Marriage Bed
Elaine Ford
Fiction
62 pages
Wordrunner eChapbooks (November 14, 2015)
FREE to read online, $2.99 Kindle & additional formats on Smashwords

The seven stories in The Marriage Bed examine the ways that romantic relationships are complex, risky, and disappointing endeavors that people can’t help but enter into. In the collection’s third story, ironically titled “Rita Lafferty’s Lucky Summer,” an unnamed narrator tells the story of her thirty-year-old female coworker’s love affair with a man who proves not to be what she initially thought. Ford develops the boyfriend’s deceit skillfully. He is purportedly a train conductor, yet is always available to pick Rita up after her work shift, no matter what time she gets off. When the narrator questions this, Rita naively answers, “He has a lot of seniority. He gets first crack at the work sheet.” In response, the narrator tells us, “Well, I believed it if she did.” Ford crafts her characters with compassion. Even when the two young women discover the boyfriend passed out in his apartment after failing to pick Rita up after work, and his drinking problem is exposed, no judgment is made of him. Or of Rita, for becoming his fiancée.

Read an excerpt from The Marriage Bed

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Medicine by Tomas BirdMedicine
Tomas Bird & The Madman’s Cabaret
EP (2016)
3 Songs
£1.50 GBP  BandCamp any and all proceeds donated to charity

Redemption for me I think,
Is now slim.

(from “Meteoros”)

Previously published in our Trigger Warning issue with his song “Senses,” Bird is back with a new EP Medicine. With a haunting ambient quality, Bird seamlessly mixes folk and psychedelic qualities together with his own soulful lyrics. Although only three songs long, this EP is a burning mix of contradictions, providing a stunning breadth of the human experience.

Take heed of the warnings,
But follow your heart.
                ***
The only aim you see,
Is to live.

(from “Draw in the Dirt”)

Listen to a sample from Medicine

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NeilNeil
J. Bradley
Flash Fiction
26 pages
Five Quarterly (2015)
FREE Issuu

Neil asks where the photos are. I hand him a sheet of paper, his favorite green crayon. “What do you want to remember?”

“Mom.”

“You know what to do.”

The crayon hits my collarbone. “I know you have to have at least one photo of her. Where is it?”

It’s better you forget. It’s better to learn to quit missing her.

(from “Habitat”)

Simultaneously sweet and creepy, Neil creates parallels between father and son. First our narrator about he and his son (the titular Neil), and then he and his father. Parenting techniques that go from “straight out of Parenthood magazine” to “curious but effective and clever” to “worse than The Great Santini” to “something isn’t right” actually serve a narrative purpose. Intergenerational kidnapping. In both: A motherless upbringing. A call to be absolutely average to avoid attention. A call to simultaneously remember and forget. For the narrator, this is second nature and, for whatever the reason, he continues his father’s tradition. No explanation offered. No explanation ever given. Not by his father to him nor one from him to Neil. Cleverly written, this is a piece full of questions with no answers. Infer and guess at your own risk.

Read excerpts from Neil

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No Ghost Goes UnnoticedNo Ghost Goes Unnoticed
M. Drew Williams
Poetry
21 pages
Leaf Garden Press (2016)
FREE pdf or name your price epub/mobi

No Ghost Goes Unnoticed is sure of itself, and aware of its distance from the world at large and its curator’s core, though as the poems progress, it becomes clear: it was not always this way. Its enticing medical metaphors slowly color in the story with hints of the poet’s empathetic, and often self-deprecating, character through poems about seemingly insignificant things as is highlighted in “Comparison.” While the cold, removed voice generically gives little away about the underlying story, there are refreshing moments of sensitivity as with “An Elegy for Daytime.” The author offers many metaphors for his distant voice in, “The Desert is Decidedly Quiet,” “Image of a Stranger,” “Conquistador,” among others. The work showcased in No Ghost Goes Unnoticed gives away how visceral the experiences that led to this book were, to house the startling awareness they give the reader. “Palabras” gives the most insight into his interactions with people, eloquently, using wordplay about a designated number of words recycled to get through the author’s day. No Ghost Goes Unnoticed explains depression, loss, and numbness in both exceedingly vulnerable and impassive, if unfeeling, ways.

Read excerpts from No Ghost Goes Unnoticed

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The Persistence of BonylegThe Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated
Sarah Minor
Hybrid
48 pages
Essay Press (2015)
FREE Issuu or pdf

126. Narrator: Maybe I will have a little child for a while. Then, when she gets too big, when she first starts hurting, I will eat her.

127. Narrator: She will only ever be the right kind of alone.

This hybrid essay explores the manner in which our patriarchal society has historically, and currently, talked about women, particularly those existing outside of the normative expectations of heterosexual marriage. With many irons in the fire, The Persistence of the Bonyleg juxtaposes the real-life history of the Lykov family, a Russian family of Old Believers who moved deep into the wilderness to avoid prosecution, with the mythology of Baba Yaga, elements of traditional fairy tale narrative, the writings of Croatian writer Dubravka Ugrešić, and the narrator’s own interjections. Agafia Lykov, the last surviving family member and an unmarried older woman, is placed center-stage. Stylistically, The Persistence of the Bonyleg splits its narrative between two collocating writing styles. Even pages recount the Lykov’s family’s struggles and religious practices in the taiga, chronicled in poetic passages which are narrated by a tree stump (one recalls The Giving Tree). Odd pages take inspiration from the Bible by numbering their verses and script conventions (most likely an influence from the documentary Far Out: Agafia’s Taiga Life) where each line is voiced by a character. Rather than lead the reader directly to a single thesis, Minor’s feminist essay asks the reader to confront the text and allow their thoughts to take part in the conversation.

Read excerpts from The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated

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PortagePortage
Sarah Ann Winn

Poetry
21 pages
Sundress Publications (2015)
FREE pdf

I was made to portage, by Portage, a girl raised by reservoirs,

lifted from one lake and carried to the next,
made to find joy in journeys.

(from “Alma”)

Stringing together vivid tellings from youth and discovery to loss and regaining wonder, Winn reminds us of the fluidity of our lives, however jagged moments seem in the now. There is movement, always some sort of progression. The highlight of this collection is simplicity: the poetry is both relatable but individual with focal points such as apples, a hammer, or camera lens. These seemingly trivial objects add tremendous depth to the poemsas we notice there’s always an object in our recollection that seems insignificant to a broader picture but was, in truth, the center of a moment.

Read excerpts from Portage

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Revisiting Dreamworlds
Revisiting Dreamworlds: Art Feature
Eddy Martin Graham

Graham’s artwork is about individuals becoming their own selves within their dreamworlds, the facing of hard facts within reality, and how by intertwining fantasy with the day to day, humans manifest their own destinies.

View Art Feature

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Shake It Up & Throw It at Something Hard
Shake it up & throw it at something hard
BT Shaw
Hybrid
30 pages
Essay Press (2016)
FREE Issuu or pdf

So you think creating a baby makes someone intelligent. I would say the opposite may be true. Why would a peaceful person like Jesus create a baby?

(from, “If Jesus was perfect, how come he couldn’t solve calculus problems and equations and create the atomic baby?”)

A game of mad libs gone awry (“Babies for bombs! Bombs for babies!”), Shake it up and throw it at something hard does more than cause some silly imagery. In the process of finding humor in a thousand babies pelting down on an unsuspecting city or swaddled-up bombs given names like Kimmy or Bryan as they are presented fresh and pink and blinking to the world, the reader is forced to give pause. In the midst of this laughter, there is a deeper contextual possibility. Overpopulation. Humans waging war. Bombs created. Bombs as tools…but only for war. (What else could bombs be? Even fireworks contain danger.) Lack of sexual education. Romanticizing war; downplaying destruction. Accessibility, accessibility, accessibility. In short: A strange yet marvelous read.

Read excerpts from Shake it up & throw it at something hard

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When Minerva's Knees Hit the Ground
When Minerva’s Knees Hit the Ground
Amanda Oaks
Poetry
55 pages
Words Dance Publishing (2016)
FREE pdf

but my mind
was made
for the game
it plays,

it lives
for the bluff

(from “In This Room We Can’t Touch the Floor”)

Oaks nods to The Deftones with this collection, but whether you dig the band or not isn’t a huge deal; these poems have their own appeal, while maintaining the rhythmic and emotive draw of music. Where that likeness ends is the conversational approach she takes to point the pieces inward or toward a lover, all while keeping things curiously anonymous. The erasures come across blunt, but show intent, whereas the original poems they’re paired with bounce between the chaos of infatuation, admissions of flaws, and the way hurt contributes to self-awareness. This layout gives the book a unique posture: strong, with earned fragilities, but ultimately resilient.

Read excerpts from When Minerva’s Knees Hit the Ground

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Reviews & Interviews

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Support a fee-free reader award and get awesome perks, including handwritten poems by Trigger Warning poets Siaara Freeman and Heather Bell, or limited edition postcards by Trigger Warning’s guest editor Meggie Royer! Help Launch Tandem Reader Awards.

TRA AD 2016 Final

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Issue #20 – Trigger Warning

 

Trigger Warning Cover cropped

noun: A brief statement alerting a reader, listener, or viewer
to troubling or traumatic content ahead.

Because of the triggering content of this issue, we have published it as a PDF, which you are welcome to redistribute in its entirety. To download and read the issue, click on the image above. Take your time. Practice self care. Be well.

Thank you to our contributors and everyone who submitted for your immense bravery and honesty, and your willingness to share such intensely personal and often painful experiences with us. We are deeply honored.

Featuring work by: Eunice Andrada, Allison Austad, Elliott batTzedek, Heather Bell, Majnun Ben-David, Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Tomas Bird, Emma Bleker, Carl Boon, Imaani Cain, Marina Carreira, Lisa D. Chavez, Hannah Clark, Martha Clarkson, Ryder Collins, Cameron Conner, Melina Coogan, Krista Cox, Vanessa Crofskey, Sally Deskins, Marta Djekic, Liz Dolan, Tyler Earls, Kari Ann Ebert, Melissa Eleftherion, Samantha Fortenberry, Siaara Freeman, Kate Garrett, Karolyn Gehrig, David Gillette, Karrie Higgins, Sophia Jakab, Janne Karlsson, Norman Klein, Dorian Kotsiopoulos, Katia Kozachok, Shawn LaSota, Lili Leader-Williams, MANDEM, JM Miller, Lakshmi Mitra, Jennifer Parks, Dustin Pearson, Simon Perchik, Alison Rumfitt, Michael Russell, Barbara Ruth, Carla Sarett, W. Jack Savage, Elaine Schleiffer, Marian Kaplun Shapiro, Rajendra Shepherd, Meghan Trask Smith, Anthony Spaeth, Meghan Sterling, Carissa L. Stevens, Mary Stone, Ani Tascian, Anne Thériault, AJ Urquidi, Clementine von Radics, Elaine Wang, Sam Herschel Wein, Jerry Wemple, and Scott Wozniak.

 

Internet exclusive: from DV Grey by Karolyn Gehrig

Reviews

 

Interested in joining our eclectic family of staff?
We have several positions open.


Meggie

 

Meggie Royer is an artist and writer from the Midwest. She is the founder of literary magazine Persephone’s Daughters and has had poems in Words Dance, The Harpoon Review, and more. In 2013, she won the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ gold medal for poetry and the silver medal for her writing portfolio. She was also an Honorable Mention recipient of the 2015 Academy of American Poets Student Poetry Prize. Read our interview with Meggie.

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Issue #19 – Writers Create: A Winter Makers’ Fair

When Kate Hammerich and I began cahoodaloodaling, we set out with some vague notion of the direction we would go—always towards and never away Read the full letter from the editor.

Writers Create Cover

Editor’s Spotlight: Flood by Molly Rideout

Call It Postmodernism by Sarah Bates & Dustin Michael

The Animation Room by Linda Kennedy

What’s Hidden by Lynn Hoffman

Giving Chocolate Raspberry Sauce: The Season to Give by Clinton Siegle

Brown Tissue Moth by Carrie Albert

Collage Undresses the Darkness by Bill Wolak

Unreadable by Allen Crawford

Circadian by Leonard Kogan

The Universe by Carol Smallwood

Fold and Gather by T.A. Noonan

Shirley Xu Interviews Cristiana Leone, Creator of Sunken

Rachel Nix Interviews Amanda Oaks of Words Dance

Our guest editor M. Mack is a genderqueer poet, editor, and fiber artist in Virginia. Ze is the author of the chapbooks Traveling (Hyacinth Girl Press, 2015) and Imaginary Kansas (dancing girl press, 2015), and the forthcoming collection Theater of Parts (Sundress Publications, 2016). Ze is a founding co-editor of Gazing Grain Press. Find hir at: mxmack.com.

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Issue #18 – Historical (Re)Tell

He says, “She spoke at Chautauquas while her stepchildren sang and danced. She was married to William Albert Wiseman, your great-great-great-grandfather. The one who founded the Methodist Church on Crocker by Woodland Cemetery. You know where that is, Laura.” Read the full Guest Editor’s Letter.

Cover Historical (Re)Tell

 Guest Editor’s Spotlight: The Hired Man by KateLynn Hibbard

Joshua Trees by Susana H. Case

Jazz Fusion Bolero by Sophie Jupillat

Remembering Hugo by Deanna Northrup

Carolina Wren by Joshua Allen Aiken

Freud Looks At a Picture of His Mother by July Westhale

(Re)Dreaming by Iryna Lialko

My Standardized Home by Terry Barr

The Lunatic Ball & Other Poems by Margo Taft Stever

Laura Madeline Wiseman Interviews Margo Taft Stever

Shards by Laura Yevchak

The Dinner by Ron Burch

Scheherazade by James Gallant

Bathing Caps Required by Timothy Gerken

Rachel Nix Interviews Kelly Boyker of Menacing Hedge

Laura Madeline WisemanLaura Madeline Wiseman is the author of twenty books and chapbooks and the editor of Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence. Her collaborative book Intimates and Fools is an Honor Book for the 2015 Nebraska Book Award. Her book Queen of the Platform explores the life of the suffragist, lecturer, and poet Matilda Fletcher Wiseman. Her critical reviews have appeared in Prairie Schooner, Ploughshares, Calyx, and The Iowa Review. She teaches poetry in the Writing for the Schools Program and in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Issue #17 – Grit by the Glass

I wanted pieces that would make me feel like I’ve been kicked in the gut one moment, and like I’ve lost  someone very dear to me the next. I wanted work that screamed, sometimes for no reason and sometimes because that is really the only way to deal with suffering sometimes. The pieces selected spoke to me in a number of ways. Not all hit me in the same way, but they all certainly hit me in some way. They were the pieces that had me thinking about them later in the day and into the next, the ones I wanted to talk about with strangers. Read the full Guest Editor’s Letter.

Guest Editor’s Spotlight: Our Fathers by Kerry Johnson

Mommy! by Janne Karlsson

Needing to Know How Penises Worked by Elliott batTzedek

The Super Sea Trade League Strike Force ™ by Adam Kotlarczyk

St. Theresa’s Apron by Rita Anderson

You Can Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye by Stefan Doru Moscu

Be Still My Soul by James Emery

In Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of GI Boots on the Ground by Gerard Sarnat

apricity to the man unraveling thread by Hannah Hamilton

All the Gorgeous Are Broken by Wel Sed

Falter Suite by Elizabeth Deanna Morris Lakes

Sister Death by Laura Madeline Wiseman

Disenfranchised by Julie Shavin

Nothing Ever Happens in a Car by Jim McGarrah

micrographie by Patrick Gaouyat

Shirley Xu Interviews Patrick Gaouyat

Rachel Nix Interviews Timothy Green of Rattle


Sam Slaughter July 2015Sam Slaughter is a writer based in Columbia, South Carolina. He received his BA from Elon University and his MA from Stetson University. He is currently at work on his MFA at the University of South Carolina. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in a variety of places, including Midwestern Gothic, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and Heavy Feather Review. He was awarded the 2014 Best of There Will Be Words and his debut chapbook When You Cross That Line was published in May 2015. His debut short story collection God in Neon will be published by Lucky Bastard Press in late 2015 and his debut novel, Dogs, will be published in 2016 by Double Life Press. He loves playing with puppies and a good glass of bourbon.

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Issue #16 – He Said/She Said

Cover 16 Final Large
Guest Editor Spotlight

The Dinner Was Lovely
by Adam Rodenberger

Art, Poetry, & Literature

Goa & Interview
by Ricardo Porto

Amelia Earhart Leaves Her Husband
by Krista Cox

Cinderella Snubs a Handout
by Elizabeth Johnston

The Cactus on the Acropolis
by Fred Zirm

A Place to Turn Around
by William Auten

Waltz Trio
by Tarkan Şendal

Couplet
by John Sokol

I Listen to a Woman Read a Poem about HIV…
by Linda Blaskey

Miss Deepfreeze 1953
by Ann Cefola

Self-Censorship & Crosswords
by Dimitri Dimov

Remembrance
by Laura Schmidt

You Probably Think This Poem Is about You
by Tovah Leah Green

Losing Faith
by Kimberly Emilia

Netherworld
by Thomas Schoenberger

Before the Movie
by Liz Purvis

Bonus Free Download:

Interview

Kate Garrett of Pankhearst & three drops from a cauldron

Book Reviews


About Our Guest Editor

Paul BeckmanPaul Beckman has had over 200 stories published online, in print and via audio and video. In 2014 he won the honorable mention prize for his flash fiction story in Ascent Aspirations. He’s had one collection of stories, two chapbooks, plus a novella published and in 2015 will have his collection of flash fiction, “Peek”, published by Big Table Publishing.

His stories have appeared in many anthologies and magazines such as: Metazen, Thrice Fiction, Connecticut Review, The Boston Literary Magazine, Pure Slush, cahoodaloodaling, Playboy, The Brooklyner, and Connotation Press amongst others. He can be read and reached at his published story website paulbeckmanstories.com.

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Issue #15 – Travelogue

Travelogue Cover Final
Travel Genre, an Essay

by Jim Ross

Guest Editor Spotlight
Pale Blue Dot
by Ruth Foley

Art, Poetry, & Literature

Bike Nation
by Dragos Ioneanu

Ankara
by David Russomano

Lunar
by Winston Plowes

The Prairie Demons
by Stephenson Muret

Twenty-seven, Twenty-four
by Maureen Alsop

From Visiting Day on the Psychiatric Ward
by Alan Catlin

This is Traverse City
by Becca Hawk

Cedar Key
by Peter Hurtgen Jr.

Safari through Southern California
by Vakseen

Salkantay
by Claire Ibarra

Waltz of the Romanovs
by Sophie Jupillat

Beggars
by Kenneth Robbins

Olive Wood
by Linda Caldwell Lee

A Place to Call Home
by Derold Sligh

Bonus Free Download:

Cover Artist: Travelogue
by Marenne Hoeksema

Interview
Kevin Rodriguez of Bop Dead City

Book Reviews

 


About Our Guest Editor

April Michelle Bratten HeadshotOriginally from Marrero, Louisiana, April Michelle Bratten has a BA in English from Minot State University in North Dakota, where she currently resides.

The daughter of an USAF active duty father, April grew up traveling and living across the United States and abroad. Her travels have greatly influenced her writing over the years, particularly her three year stay in Incirlik, Turkey. April adores the quiet beauty of the upper-midwest prairies, but she feels the most at home in the American deep south.

Her publications include decomP, Thrush Poetry Journal, Southeast Review, Stirring, Sheepshead Review, and Punchnel’s, among others. She is the Supreme Empress of Up the Staircase Quarterly and a contributing editor at Words Dance Publishing.

April’s next chapbook, Anne with an E, is forthcoming from dancing girl press in 2015. Her other chapbooks include Raw Dogs and Other Metaphors (Maverick Duck Press, 2012) and Drink This (Citizens for Decent Literature Press, 2012.) Her first full length poetry collection, It Broke Anyway, is available now from NeoPoiesis Press.

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Issue #14 – The Animal Becomes Us

Play Editor’s Letter

 

Cover Image by Jenny Schukin


Guest Editor Spotlight:
Lucky Cat
by N. West Moss

Art, Poetry, & Literature

Blessings
by Jenny Schukin

Ritual
by Elaine Wang

Among the Animals
by Susannah Carlson

An Old Dog Teaches My Dog to Swim
by Elizabeth Johnston

From Leave of Absence
by Sally Deskins & Laura Madeline Wiseman

Whale Song @ 52 Hz
by William James

What Toast
by M. Mack

Quanta Smears
by Robert Bharda (Ward)

Great Blue Heron
by Martin Elster

Brazen Bull
by Melinda Dubbs

The Color of Tarsiers
by Clinton Crockett Peters

Totoro
by Natalya Sukhonos

Creative Spark
By Luis Sanchez Saturno

Bonus Free Download: Morgan Bears Up
by Donald Dewey

Book Reviews

Temporary Champions
by Darren C. Demaree

Don’t Forget Me, Bro
by John Michael Cummings


About Our Guest Editor
KristinKristin Nehs grew up tangled between Tennessee and Florida and has the Dollywood memorabilia and sawgrass scars to prove it. She holds an MFA from Oregon State in one hand and a cello in the other. Her interests include sordid human affairs and pontificating. In her spare time she wrangles cats.

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Issue #13 – SLAM IT!

 

Play Editor’s Letter

1 - slapped
Guest Editor’s Spotlight:
I Slept in the Middle of the Bed Last Night
by Blythe Cooper

Time Is Of
by Jhaki M.S. Landgrebe

Brick
by Paul Beckman

Tonight I Am Old Again
by Cailin Rhiannon

Women of Pride
by Amoxes

You Are, You Will Be
by Orooj-e-Zafar

The Fallout
by Katie Simpson

The Death of Marilyn Monroe
by Carlton D. Fisher

What Is This Thing Called Love
by Holly Day

My Grandmother Had a Blanket of Galaxies
by Meghedi Tamazian

Stream
by Gravity


About Our Guest Editor
LalliJason Lalli, AKA Lalli, is the co-founder/entertainment chair of the Phoenix Festival of the Arts, creator and host of Infuse – Open Mic, 3-time author, and is one of Phoenix’s veteran spoken word artists. He uses his gift for poetry as a form of motivational speaking and believes a person does not need to have money to give back to their community. He utilizes his abilities, voice, and networks to their fullest potential in an attempt to make our world a better place. He can be found at: www.lalli-poet.com

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