Tag Archives: m.f. nagel

2014 Nominations

 Pushcart Nominations

Lucky Cat
by N. West Moss

Changeling
by Kate Garrett

A Practical Guide to Building and Maintaining an Office Relationship
by Karen Jakubowski

Ritual
by Elaine Wang

An Old Dog Teaches My Dog to Swim
by Elizabeth Johnston

Dark Spot
by Aaron Z Hawkins

Best of the Net Nominations

Little Yellow Horses
by Neil Ellman

Senior Citizens at the Retirement Center Discuss John Ashbery’s “More Reluctant”
by Faith Paulsen

Anaïs Nin. A Poem. Unread.
by m.f. nagel

Grit in Your Eyes
by Stephanie Valente

Man in the Moon
by Camille Griep

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Issue #10 – Inspired by the Artist

Editor’s Note

cover-10

Guest Editor’s Spotlight:
Aubade
by C.J. Matthews

Little Yellow Horses
by Neil Ellman

Senior Citizens at the Retirement Center Discuss John Ashbery’s “More Reluctant”
by Faith Paulsen

Cubism
by Deborah Edler Brown

Anaïs Nin. A Poem. Unread.
by m.f. nagel

The City
by Najai Khaled


About Our Guest Editor

Mighty Jess

Mighty Jess

Jessica Lindsay began poetry the same way she began photography: when someone told her “Hey, you’re pretty good.” Of course, “pretty good” in seventh grade was actually morbidly bad, and it wasn’t until her junior year of high school that she realized that poetry could be something more than teenage angst. So her poetry turned more into snapshots of her life, and when her interest in photography grew, her writing hit a rather large block that she constantly struggles to get through. Well, that and inner peace doesn’t really give an emotional writer much to work with.

To date, all of her favorite poems happen to be the ones about her very dysfunctional family. Figures. She is currently trying to write a novel, but that is forever a work in progress simply because she always wants to skip to the “good stuff”.

She is very shy about people in her life reading her poetry, so it can only be found on Jessicaconk.deviantart.com. She was once published in her community college’s lit mag and got honorable mention for a horrible story back in eighth grade.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share